Find the Right Animal Attack Attorneys

Anyone who owns or keeps animals, whether domestic or wild, is legally responsible for the harm caused by their animals. The law, obviously, does not hold animals responsible for their actions, because they are not considered to be moral agents possessed of free will. And, legally, animals are considered property. Owners of property are responsible for it, and are expected to keep it in such a condition that it does not pose an unreasonable risk of harm to others.

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Animals are a somewhat special case, because they can act of their own volition. Nonetheless, their owners are considered responsible for any harm they cause. Usually, however, the owner must bear some type of fault for the harm. Freak accidents which nobody could foresee generally do not create liability, whether or not animals are involved. Read more.


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Finding the Right Animal Attack Attorneys

Generally, the standard by which the conduct of pet-owners is judged is called "negligence." In general, people are expected to go about their daily lives taking reasonable care not to cause harm to others. You are expected to behave as a "reasonable person" in similar circumstances would. If your conduct falls below this standard, and causes harm to somebody, you are liable to that person for whatever harm is caused. If you handle your pets in a negligent fashion (letting large dogs run free around the neighborhood, for example), you are liable for any injury or property damage that they cause.

There are many common practices related to animals that might be considered negligent. They most commonly involve dogs, which are not leashed or properly supervised, biting people, knocking them over (which can cause pretty serious injuries), or damaging property. A failure to take any reasonable steps to discipline an animal to correct problem behavior is also negligent.

In some cases, you might be liable for harm caused by an animal, no matter how careful you were. Liability without fault ("strict liability") can be imposed when harm results from activities considered so dangerous that no amount of care can eliminate the risk of harm. Included in this list of activities is the keeping of wild or dangerous animals. So, if you have a pet bear (for example), you will be liable for any harm it causes, no matter how careful you were. The same goes for domestic animals (dogs, cats, etc.) which have a known history of violent behavior. If you have been injured by an animal, you should consult with an animal attack attorney.


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